HYPEBEAST REVIEWS THE NEW TECH BOMBER

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Via Hypebeast: Premium outerwear brand COLDSMOKE returns with a seasonal addition to its 2015 fall/winter collection. Dubbed the Tech Bomber, the jacket is constructed with a Japanese soft-shell waterproof fabric that allows for optimal breathability and protection against harsh winter conditions, available in either a Charcoal or Deep Green colorway. The technical textile is bonded to a deluxe fleece lining that provides both warmth and comfort. Detailing on the piece also includes American-made waterproof zippers, heavy-duty custom knit ribbing, nylon gold-colored binding, and an inner media pocket. Combining both functionality and a rugged design, the piece is a standout wardrobe must-have for the colder months ahead. You can shop the Tech Bomber now at the COLDSMOKE webstore.

COLDSMOKE CHRONICLE: ICELAND

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EXPLORING THE CANADIAN ROCKIES WITH THE GREAT NORTH COLLECTIVE

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Last week the Great North Collective loaded up their car with Coldsmoke, coffee, jerky, and camera gear, for a five day expedition through the Canadian Rockies.   David GuentherMike Seehagel and Chris Amat  joined up with fellow Albertans Callum Snape,Taylor Burk, and Jeff Bartlett.  Here’s a selection of images they captured during their five days of driving, hiking, and flying through Canmore Kananaskis and Jasper, two of the most beautiful areas on earth.

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ON THE ROAD WITH COLDSMOKE WINTER FILM TOUR

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2 weeks, 2,200 Miles, 41 hours behind the wheel,  five states, one province, three mountain ranges, gallons of beer, tons of new friends, and countless memories. Needless to say, the Coldsmoke Winter Film Tour was a blast. Thanks to everyone who came out, got inspired by the latest winter films, shared the stoke, and picked up some Coldsmoke gear! Its all added up to the Coldsmoke Awards show, January 10th in Bozeman MT, at the Emerson Center for the Arts and Culture. There’s still time to vote for the people’s choice award and be entered to win a cat skiing trip for two at Powder Mountain, in Whistler, and $1000.

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COLDSMOKE CHRONICLES: FORREST’S ALASKAN ADVENTURE

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When I was 4 years old my grandfather returned from Alaska, where he had been a hunting guide for 21 years on the Kenai Peninsula and Aleutian Islands. Of the many things he brought back with him, from bearskin rugs to native crafts, the most important treasures where his stories. I was too young to retain his words, but they lived on through my father’s telling. As a boy, listening to my grandfather’s stories, and stories of my father’s journeys, instilled in me a sense of adventure that has evolved into my way of life.

In August of 2014, I made an explicit goal that within the next year I would visit Alaska and see the land that my grandfather had loved and lived in. I had absolutely no prospects for realizing such a bold claim, but as with many things in life, taking the first step is the catalyst for achieving our dreams.

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J.P. AUCLAIR AND ANDREAS FRANSSON WILL BE MISSED

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Today sad news struck the skiing community as professional skiers J.P. Auclair and Andreas Fransson are confirmed dead after an avalanche slid 700 meters off of Monte San Lorenzo, located on the border between Argentina and Chile in Patagonia.  Their innovative and inspirational presence in the world of skiing will be missed.

Here’s a look back at J.P. and Andreas doing what they loved.

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THE LIFE AND RISE OF ERIC JACKSON

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Check out this great short snowboarding film chronicling the tenacity and talent of Eric Jackson. Through archival footage of Eric as a precocious pioneer in his early teens on Mammoth, to present day shots of huge backcountry air in Whistler, this is more than a sports film- it’s an inspiring narrative of the dedication, passion, and joy required to become one of the best riders in the world.

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#COLDSTOKED IN #JAPOW

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Rather than lamenting how Japan is hogging all the snow, we sent a crew of Coldsmoke pow hunters including Pascal Shirley, August Thurmer, and Chandler Kane to get #coldstoked in the land of the rising sun. In Niseko our team connected with legendary Gentemstick shaper Taro Tomai, Their early Instagram returns make for good armchair traveling and a lot of envy. Try not to hate…

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#COLDSTOKED IN BOZEMAN – IPHONE PICS

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I went to Bozeman, Montana for the first time for the CSA show. I had never been to that part of the country before, so I was extremely curious as to what I was about to encounter. Because of that, I decided to fly in the day before the rest of the team so that I could explore with some invited guests and friends, Jared Chambers and Laura Austin. We drove around on Friday to find some cool spots to get some photos. In case you are unfamiliar, Jared and Laura are incredible at the whole Instagram thing. After you get through this post, I highly recommend clicking on their links provided and see what they are all about.

Anyway, we found a really great spot in Hyalite Canyon. We went for a hike in the snow that led up to a really amazing frozen waterfall. We climbed up to get some shots and take in the scenery that I am sharing with you here.

Stay tuned for more photos shot by Laura this week!

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COLDSMOKE CHRONICLES – ANGELES NATIONAL FOREST

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A weekend into L.A.’s famed Angeles National Forest – and a list of activities to keep you from being bored as dirt.

By Anna Harmon

 

When I was in 3rd grade, my family sold our house before our next was ready. With three kids to their name and a summer to kill (my dad was a teacher and my mom a housewife), my parents bought a pop-up camper and off we headed from Colorado to Canada. Those three months of wandering from campsite to campsite gave me a forever affection for living among the forest, accessible and communal but still rustic – with a crisp view of the stars. It also taught the three of us how to entertain ourselves on little but pinecones and whatever entertainment we had stowed away.

Which came in handy when a friend and I headed to a campsite deep in Angeles National Forest on a last-minute whim. One of the things hailed about California is the contrast of urbanity with stunning views, so it was great to quickly find ourselves cruising up the San Gabriel curves. Once we arrived at our campground, we realized all we had packed for entertainment was a ukulele and plenty of potatoes and foil. So I decided to come up with a list of easy ways to entertain, spurred by my childhood, and the kids at the campsite next to us.

1. The quintessential argument: log cabin or teepee fire formation? This can last for hours, alongside poking at flames.
2. Seed-spitting contests. I recommend watermelon or cherries.
3. Pinecone fights. Or, if you are like the family next to us, rocks. Small rocks, please.
4. Cook something. Try to cook something. Try to make a convection oven with foil for your mozzarella and tomato sandwiches. Failure is OK (Confession: We tried and failed).
5. Leave the rain flap off your tent, if the weather is right. Go to bed early and stargaze.
6. Don’t go to bed early, and drink lots of beer. Duck tape empty cans together to make a wizard’s staff. (Grown-ups only.)
7. Take advantage of whatever music your camping neighbors decide to play. In our case, the climax was when “The Macarena” came on and a little boy danced on the trunk of the car, guided by his older sister. Got my limbs itching!
8. Track down a brook, crick, river. Make, or dibs, boats. Race them.
9. Fish. If you didn’t come prepared for this either, and you are in the Angeles National Forest, you may unfortunately be able to grab a stick and fish for trash. Do your piece to return nature to its natural state.
10. Hike, of course. Head out early. Try to find a trail with natural rock water slides – it exists!
11. Find rocks. Climb them.
12. Make a marshmallow volcano. Track down an empty glass bottle and pack it full of marshmallows. Set at the center of a small fire or embers. As the marshmallows melt, pressure builds up … and kapow! This takes time, and is another variation on ‘stare at fire.’
13. Tell scary stories. Because seriously, stop taking yourself so seriously, and hold that flashlight under your chin.

 

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COLDSMOKE CHRONICLES: RYEN MOTZEK OF PRISTINE PARKING

 

A conversation with Ryen Motzek of Atlas Skateboards and Pristine Parking.

By Jeanine Pesce

Images by Jeanine Pesce

Skateboarders are known for their ability to hustle – literally and figuratively. Whether it’s pushing around town or messing around at the park, they are always onto the next before you even realize that they have breezed by you. This concept of movement got us thinking about progression, which got us thinking about speed, which got us thinking about cars, which eventually got us thinking about parking in a very specific way.

Ever noticed that almost every skate dude you know has worked as a valet at some point in their adult life? And, have you ever noticed that 9 times out of 10, they also own a coach’s jacket, which is strangely similar to the uniform that a parking attendant wears? Is it a coincidence? Is it some kind of right of passage? Or is it just common sense that most skaters like to whip something fast on four wheels, with or without a motor. Do you see where we are going with this?

“We require a clean driving record, a valid driver’s license, skilled drivers, a proper appearance, and a magnificent attitude.” This is the ethos that Pristine Parking was built upon. Founded by our friend and co-owner of Atlas Skateboarding in San Mateo, Ryen Motzek, Pristine has offered a range of parking-related services to local San Francisco business’ for over 10 years now. We wanted to pick his brain to get a better understanding of how these two seemingly different worlds share the same space. We learned one important fact right off the bat…you can’t be an out of shape person and do valet. You have to be quick on your toes, so if you skate or surf, you’re naturally a good fit for this kind of work.

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COLDSMOKE CHRONICLES: WINDY JOE

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Trail-blazing the north end of the Pacific Crest Trail with Joe Hilton, the last of the great mountain men.

By Ellen Johnston

It runs along the jagged western spine of the North American continent, burning fire in the south, and blowing snow in the north. It’s 2,663 miles long, tracing a line from the Mexican border to the Canadian one, and just across it, in fact. It’s the Pacific Crest Trail, one of the world’s ultimate long distance hikes, though it’s rarely tackled in one go. To do so is to commit to a minimum of five months trekking through the spring, summer and fall, with thorough preparation beforehand.

Near the northern end of the trail, just on the U.S. side of the border lies Hozomeen, a sharp-toothed double-summited rock peak, of which its most famous viewer wrote “Hozomeen, Hozomeen, the most mournful mountain I’ve ever seen.” That man was Jack Kerouac, who penned the words when he was working as a fire lookout in the area in 1956, mere months before he heard the news that the book that would make him famous, On the Road, was going to be published. Kerouac idolized the mountain men who had come before him, and there, in the northern wilderness, was trying to connect to them through his own Massachusetts-raised, Quebecois-descended, Ivy League, hard-drinking, poetical Pan-American lens.

Further north across the border, with Hozomeen still in plain site, lies another mountain, Windy Joe, which stands right near the terminus of the Pacific Crest Trail, in Manning Provincial Park. The mountain was given this name because its peak was thought to be so windy that snow could never settle there, a theory proposed by long-time park-employee Joe Hilton, for whom the mountain was also named. He also happened to be the one who built this final section of the Pacific Crest Trail, along with a young university student as his assistant, and a motley crew consisting mostly of ex-cons and juvenile delinquents to aid him. If Kerouac was looking for a particular version of manhood to inspire him, this was it, though Hilton was far too humble to ever seek that kind of fame. But that doesn’t mean that he was just any old “joe”. Joe Hilton was the last of an era. He was the last of the mountain men.

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COLDSMOKE CHRONICLES: CATALINA ESSENTIALS

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By Anna Harmon

1 adventurous, seafaring man.

This man’s seaworthy sailboat.

5 companions to help set up sail and bum a ride. Note: One must be a willful volunteer to hold the wheel and keep her eyes on knots (rope, speed).

60 beers. Two bottles of bubbly. Orange juice. Ice.

Bread. Hummus. Meat. Note: No, sharks will not mistake salami tied on string for chum.

Optional, 1 set of binoculars. Because while sharks may not chomp at your toes, pods of dolphins are a sick sight and you’ll want a better look as they frolic behind your boat.

A plethora of windbreakers, sweaters, beanies. The wind whips, the Pacific cools.

SPF.  Those rays, while charming, will smite you.

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1 bag of ginger chews and 1 box of homeopathic motion sickness medicine in preparation for the middle of the journey, which you will promptly replace with non-homeopathic motion sickness medicine at the Catalina General Store for the way back. If you don’t get seasick, call your parents and thank them for your sea-legged genes.

2 $3 kites: multi-colored, bird-shaped. Two because one will promptly drop and flail in the water, string snapping with force of the ocean. Get the other flying, tie to the end of the boat. Name this bird. Be sad when the wind lags and it nosedives. Drink a beer. Look at real birds and layers of their white shit on a rock jutting out of the ocean. Observe that it looks like a finger at the sky. You are along the Catalina coastline.

1 dinghy. This will get all of you (minus those who decide to swim) and your gear to the island after you dock offshore.

3 tents, sleeping bags, flashlights.

1 spot to set up camp.

Dollar bills. Exchange for a bison burger at the only restaurant open, a game of pool, and drinks from the sole bartender on the entire island if it is a Monday at 9 pm.

Board shorts/bikinis. Celebrate night with a swim among jumping fish. Celebrate morning with a dive off a dock into crisp, cool water.

Hiking boots. Wear these while following a trail higher and higher along a Catalina mountain ridge, until you see nothing of the sea, just mist. Realize how quiet the island is, like you are in a waking dream.

A straw hat. Don while piloting the dinghy back to your boat, docked among a handful of watercrafts that hold people who pop their heads up like gophers, sunbathe on their decks, prep fishing gear, nap in their homes on the water.

Sails. The snap of canvas and creak of ropes mean you are cruising back to the mainland courtesy of nature.

Sharp eyes. A ways out, watch as the sun dances along the horizon. A dozen yards away, a large triangular shape will bob, motionless, attached to a something heavy beneath, barely floating, until the shape, which you determine must be a fin, right? grows smaller and smaller in your view and disappears among rolling waves. Ahead, buildings will begin to appear off stretches of sand. The ocean will forever keep its mystery. Catalina was a dream.

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